If you have ever had an accident that cracked your car windshield, then you know that it can ruin your visibility. And more importantly, if you don’t take care of it, the crack could spread and do even more damage. While you could easily have the whole windshield replaced, in certain circumstances some people choose to have it repaired. So your car’s windshield is cracked: should you repair it or replace it? Let’s discuss which one is the best option for you.

Step 1: Check The Location

The location of the scratch or crack can make a big difference in your final decision. If your crack rests at the very edge of your windshield, it will spread quickly. This inevitably compromises the integrity of your glass. If the repair company catches it in time, it can be repaired. However, most professionals would advise that this windshield be replaced entirely. As a matter of fact, some repair shops will even refuse to repair it if it’s in the driver’s direct line of vision because it may distort your glass and compromise your visibility.

Step 2: Measure The Length Of The Crackwindshield is cracked: should you repair it or replace it

Use a tape measure to find the length of the crack. Most repair shops are willing to repair chips and crack that are as much as three inches long. If it exceeds this, most will recommend that you replace the windshield. Though there are certain facilities that use special techniques to fix cracks that measure up to 12 inches long.

Step 3: Examine Your Budget

The average cost to repair a single rock chip will be around $40-$50. However, if your windshield crack is longer than three inches, it could require special treatment and could cost around $70 to repair. Conversely, replacement can costs considerably more. The cost varies depending on the make and year of your vehicle. Not only will you be paying for the windshield itself, but also the molding kit and labor that go along with it.

Step 4: Call Around To Find Out Which Shop Repairs and/or Repairs

When choosing a repair shop, you should keep in mind that not every repair shop is the same. For example, automotive glass specialists specialize in the repair and replacement of automotive glass, including windshields, side and rear windows. The individuals will default to repairing the windshield before they recommend replacing it. Windshield repair facilities are independent, franchised shops that only repair windshields. Yes, they fix small cracks and chips but they don’t replace windshields. New car dealers can replace the windshield with an OEM–the original equipment. Though there are dealers who sub-contract to mobile glass services and can have them replace your windshield on-site.

Step 5: Call Your Insurance Company

One of the most important factors in determining whether to replace or repair your windshield is contacting your insurance company. You need to find out what your insurance will actually cover. Most insurance companies cover the windshield. However, replacement can be very expensive, so each company handles it differently when deciding whether to replace or repair.

Replacement means that the insurance company will likely ask you to pay a deductible and then they will pay for the entire replacement. However, if you decide to simply repair it, some insurance companies will waive the deductible entirely and pay for the whole process. This often encourages customers to repair the windshields instead of replacing it. It also ensures that both you and the company can save a little money on your policy. Just remember that if your windshield really does need replacement, then you should replace it. Not only is it difficult to drive with a damaged windshield, it’s also very unsafe. The integrity may have been compromised.

There are several factors involved when it comes to replacing or repairing your windshield. Not only should you consider how severe the damage is, but you should also consider how much the job will cost, who can do it and what your insurance covers. With the proper research, you’ll find that this particular decision virtually makes itself.